Green Team members set up their first Earth Day Fest in hopes of spreading awareness of their school garden and community service opportunities. Proceeds from tattoo and face painting sales will go towards gardening supplies and additional plants. PHOTO BY MARC YANOFSKY

Green Team members set up their first Earth Day Fest in hopes of spreading awareness of their school garden and community service opportunities. Proceeds from tattoo and face painting sales will go towards gardening supplies and additional plants. PHOTO BY MARC YANOFSKY

By Jesus Rojas-Venzor

Bonita Vista High School recently held its first Earth Day Fair on Thursday April 21. The Green Team’s senior co-presidents Amaya Ramsay-Malone, Daniela Davidoff and Izabela Garcia-Arce worked closely with the Uprising Club and its president senior Jessica Carreon, to make the fair possible.

The fair took place during lunch to avoid conflicts with the MORP assembly, according to Davidoff. The Green Team experimented with this small fair, which at first, started off as a simple idea.

“[Daniela, Amaya and I] were talking one day and we thought, ‘wouldn’t it be cool if we could have a fair, just to celebrate Earth Day?’ The school doesn’t really have that, [and] there is no real emphasis on the environment and Earth Day,” Garcia-Arce said. “Last year we did a sculpture made out of trash for Earth Day. This year we wanted to do something more fun and interactive, so we had this idea to put [the fair] together and it happened.”

Since the fair was a relatively recent idea, Green Team made certain adjustments to find what they could do as a club having a fair on campus.

“We had the idea maybe three weeks ago and we just slowly planned it. [We] ordered paints and tattoos and just went through what we could and couldn’t do legally,” Garcia-Arce said.

Although clubs like the Uprising Club are not necessarily dedicated to environmental causes, they decided to be part of the fest in order to serve a purposeful endeavor and to raise awareness of the duty society has to protect the Earth.

“[We] wanted to help out the Green Team because we believe that we have to take care of our environment. We can see this in our own Bible within early Genesis, it says man is the ruler of Earth and should respect it,” Carreon said.

Besides raising money by selling temporary tattoos and through face painting, Green Team also had a small turtle area where students could feed the turtles. However, their major goal was to raise awareness of their presence on campus as well to create an educated community.

“The face painting and the tattoo ideas came about because we wanted people to be able to have fun while also supporting an environmentally conscious cause, [such as] the Green Team garden. The booth we had about the garden was there to encourage students to participate in the garden and support us in whatever way they could,” Ramsay-Malone said.

Since it was the first Earth Day fest, Green Team secured what they needed for the fest by arranging everything relatively fast with other clubs and the Associated Student Body (ASB).

“We talked to Jessica Carreon from the Uprising Club […] we talked to our club members and they said they were for it. Whoever could help came out and helped. We just happened over texts and meetings,” Garcia-Arce said.

A secondary goal for Earth Day Fest, although not met, was to inform people about the current Flint Water crisis in Flint, Michigan, where residents are being poisoned by dangerous amounts of lead from the Detroit Water and Sewage Department. Green Team expected to include the crisis since it not only threatens the environment but the lives of thousands.

“We wanted to have a booth that described what was happening and let people know about what they could do to help the situation. We wanted to do it primarily through the Human Rights Club because it’s a good example of the intersection between environmental degradation and human rights,” Ramsay-Malone said. “But we didn’t have enough money [and] volunteers to expand.”

Overall, the main purpose for the fest is to raise awareness and devote a special day on campus to a fest never held on campus before.

“I think [students will be more interested] once it’s more ‘in their face’ and they see that it’s there. Maybe they just didn’t know it existed. Honestly [we] just [wanted] to put [the Earth Day Fest] out there because when we go to fest, big ones, it’s really exciting to see people and things going on. [These people are] so involved, we want to motivate people,” Garcia-Arce said.