AP US History teacher and judge Don Dumas announces the winners of the Halloween costume contest. The judges, Marissa Piceno, Eileen Hay, and Kalie Betts observed the costumes and asked some questions before deciding on the winners. PHOTO BY MARC YANOFSKY

AP US History teacher and judge Don Dumas announces the winners of the Halloween costume contest. The judges, Marissa Piceno, Eileen Hay, and Kalie Betts observed the costumes and asked some questions before deciding on the winners. PHOTO BY MARC YANOFSKY

By Kathy Tang

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

@KathyCrusader

Dozens of students in costumes gathered in the quad on Oct. 31 for the annual Halloween costume contest held by the Associated Student Body and hosted by juniors and ASB spirit commissioners Ramiro Hampson-Medina and Michael Lopez.

“We were trying to help get people with good costumes to join in, but not that many people came. I’ve seen a lot of costumes that could have won today if they joined the contest,” junior ASB commissioner Alec Meraux said.

Originally, ASB spirit commissioners planned on having two contests—one for the scariest costume and one for the funniest costume. However, because of low participation, the second contest was cancelled. According to winners Meraux and freshman Tristan Johnson, they had joined the competition because they noticed low attendance.

“I thought I had a pretty good chance at winning. I saw the other costumes and I didn’t think they were that impressive. I figured mine looked pretty good so I hopped in,” Johnson said.

In total, there were three winners chosen by a panel of four teacher based on entertainment value. Johnson and freshman Andrew Wiesmann won in a partnership as the Joker and the Penguin from the DC Universe. Meraux won with a costume he borrowed from his mother: Fiona from the movie Shrek. Teachers Don Dumas, Kalie Betts, Eileen Hay and Marissa Piceno were chosen to judge based on their consistent participation in spirit days in the past.

“It would be amazing to see a lot more people participating in spirit weeks but a lot of people just don’t want to. People don’t think it’s cool because they want to dress nice, but it’s cool to show your school spirit by dressing up,” Meraux said.

Junior ASB spirit commissioner Samantha Fakhimi contributed to planning the event and put together the candy prizes for the winners. Fakhimi and Meraux hope to continue hosting spirit days to increase student participation. In an effort to publicize the event, the ASB twitter account “@BVHS_ASB” had posted guidelines for costumes four days prior to the lunch time activity. Spirit commissioners will continue to collaborate with public relations commissioners to engage more students through social media.

“Even when I wasn’t a spirit commissioner, I would always smile when I watched the costume contests and spirit activities. I feel like by doing this and seeing your own classmates go up there dressed up, it encourages you to feel more confident coming to school. Put yourself out there and do what’s comfortable for you,” Fakhimi said.